Denture

Introduction

Dentures, also known as false teeth, are prosthetic devices constructed to replace missing teeth, and which are supported by surrounding soft and hard tissues of the oral cavity. Conventional dentures are removable; however there are many different denture designs, some which rely on bonding or clasping onto teeth or dental implants. There are two main categories of dentures, depending on whether they are used to replace missing teeth on the mandibular arch or the maxillary arch.



COMPLETE DENTURES

Complete dentures can be either "conventional" or "immediate." Made after the teeth have been removed and the gum tissue has begun to heal, a conventional denture is ready for placement in the mouth about 8 to 12 weeks after the teeth have been removed.



PARTIAL DENTURES

A removable partial denture or bridge usually consists of replacement teeth attached to a pink or gum-colored plastic base, which is connected by metal framework that holds the denture in place in the mouth. Partial dentures are used when one or more natural teeth remain in the upper or lower jaw.



FAQS

Q. Will I feel good with my new dentures?

  • Replacing unsightly diseased teeth will help you feel good about yourself.
  • You can expect your dentures to look natural, unobtrusive and attractive.
  • Physical appearance matters to us. Most of us want to look as good as possible.
  • Having an attractive physical appearance improves self-esteem.

Q. What are dentures made of?

The base of the denture is made of gum-coloured acrylic, which is sometimes reinforced with metal for extra strength.
The teeth are made of acrylic or porcelain.

Q. Will Dentures Make Me Look Different?

Dentures are made to closely resemble your natural teeth so there should be no noticeable change to your appearance. In fact, dentures may even improve your smile and fill out your facial appearance.

Q. Will Eating With New Dentures Be Difficult?

Eating with new dentures will take a little practice and may be uncomfortable for some wearers for a few weeks. To get used to the new denture, start with soft foods cut into small pieces. Chew slowly using both sides of your mouth. As you get used to your new dentures, add other foods until you return to your normal diet. Be cautious with hot or hard foods and sharp-edged bones or shells. And, avoid foods that are extremely sticky or hard. You may want to avoid chewing gum while you adjust to the denture. Also, don't use toothpicks while wearing dentures.

Q. Will Dentures Change How I Speak?

After you get dentures, you may have difficulty pronouncing certain words. If so, practice by saying the difficult words out loud. With practice and with time you will become accustomed to speaking properly with your denture.